Life-saving treatments learned from war being missed

Emergency Medicine_Anesthesiology_HematologyTrauma is responsible for more global deaths annually than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Yet healthcare systems in many countries are missing out on life-saving treatments learned on the battlefield, according to a review by King’s College London and published today in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.Medical advancements made by the military in times of conflict, are increasingly seen in the hospitals of high income countries but are being missed in poorer countries, where trauma is the leading cause of death in young people. Many innovations by frontline doctors in stabilising and treating severely wounded soldiers could be adapted for use in other healthcare settings.The review was conducted by the Centre for Global Health at King’s College London, in collaboration with the International Prevention Research Institute (IPRI). It calls for research and changes in policy to determine how innovations in military medicine can be transferred to civilian populations, particularly in low-resource regions where the more simple and cost-effective of these medical advances could be implemented.

Read the rest of the article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/291231.php.

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