Monthly Archives: March 2015

Life-saving treatments learned from war being missed

Emergency Medicine_Anesthesiology_HematologyTrauma is responsible for more global deaths annually than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Yet healthcare systems in many countries are missing out on life-saving treatments learned on the battlefield, according to a review by King’s College London and published today in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.Medical advancements made by the military in times of conflict, are increasingly seen in the hospitals of high income countries but are being missed in poorer countries, where trauma is the leading cause of death in young people. Many innovations by frontline doctors in stabilising and treating severely wounded soldiers could be adapted for use in other healthcare settings.The review was conducted by the Centre for Global Health at King’s College London, in collaboration with the International Prevention Research Institute (IPRI). It calls for research and changes in policy to determine how innovations in military medicine can be transferred to civilian populations, particularly in low-resource regions where the more simple and cost-effective of these medical advances could be implemented.

Read the rest of the article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/291231.php.

Newly identified compounds in spider venom could help treat chronic pain

Anesthesiology_Pain ManagementThe thought of spiders may make your skin crawl, but a new study suggests that maybe we should put our hatred of the eight-legged beasts to one side; their venom could lead to a more effective treatment for the 100 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain.Chronic pain – defined as pain that lasts longer than 3-6 months – is the most common cause of long-term disability in the US. It occurs when nerves in a part of the body send continuous signals to the brain via pain pathways.Past studies have found that, in humans, one of the most common pathways involved in chronic pain is Nav1.7. The researchers of this latest study – led by Prof. Glenn King of the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at The University of Queensland in Australia – believe targeting this pathway could help treat a wide range of pain conditions.”A compound that blocks Nav1.7 channels is of particular interest for us,” says Prof. King. “Previous research shows indifference to pain among people who lack Nav1.7 channels due to a naturally-occurring genetic mutation – so blocking these channels has the potential of turning off pain in people with normal pain pathways.”
Read the rest of the article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/290338.php.